Harrison's Actions Break the Promise of Restructuring

Broken Promises: LCMS Restructuring

In 2010, the LCMS adopted sweeping changes to the Handbook of the Synod. Here’s the strange twist:  while the convention adopted the “Blue Ribbon Taskforce” changes, delegates also strangely (and certainly ironically) then elected as President a man who opposed the changes, Matthew Harrison. Delegates wanted Synod’s work to be more responsive to the congregations of the Synod. What have we gotten instead?

Nominations for Synod Office

Nominations Can Be Light in the Darkness…

In the January Reporter, listed under the “Official Notice” section, a very timely and important posting was made by the Secretary of Synod.  It is time to submit nominations for national convention-elected positions.  Click HERE to read the text of the Official Notice from the online version of the Reporter. While the convention isn’t until July 20-25, 2019, preparations are already in full swing.  This “Official Notice” was followed up on January 15, 2018 with Mailing #6, a post card summarizing what positions are open for nominations at this time. The positions that are open for nominations are as follows: Secretary of Synod LCMS Board of Directors (At-Large and Regional) LCMS Boards for National and International Mission (Regional) Commission on Theology and Church Relations Concordia Historical Institute Board of Governors Concordia Publishing House Board of Directors Lutheran Church Extension Fund Board of Directors Concordia University System Board of Directors Concordia

Character and Ethics are a lighthouse shining in the storm

Character and Ethics Needed in Our Next President

“Faithful churches cultivate character.”  Thus writes Concordia Seminary Professor Joel Biermann in his book, A CASE FOR CHARACTER: Towards a Lutheran Virtue Ethics. 1 Rev. Dr. Biermann recounts how Lutherans are unfairly portrayed as soteriological reductionists pitting law and gospel against one another.  Some critics say Lutheran theology and ethical teaching simply don’t fit together.  Biermann admits some Lutheran preachers have indeed spent too little pulpit time on clear Scriptures regarding how we Christians ought to live. Dr. Biermann’s prescriptions for re-emphasizing our Lutheran Confessions’ solid commitment to character and virtue ethics are valuable.  His book’s message is also timely as we witness widely-known men losing leadership positions due to their wrongful actions toward women as revealed via the #metoo movement. Joel reminds fellow pastors, “Christian people need to be trained in virtue.  A noble character does not simply happen.” He also believes community can still shape and sustain a

Who Serves Who in Synod? Congregation Self-Governance Versus Hierarchialism

Congregational Self-Governance Versus Hierarchialism

 The History, Theology and Practice of Congregational Self-Governance in the LCMS In terms of governance and order, the Missouri Synod has throughout its history balanced power between the baptized and the ordained.  We have made our decisions at conventions through votes mediated by an equal representation of clergy and laity.  These votes were not to be viewed as mandates, but as carefully crafted and thoroughly dialogued advice. In a fun, tongue-in-cheek essay, the Editorial Staff of Congregations Matter has provided another brief history of the LCMS on one issue:  Congregational Self-Governance as opposed to the current Synod trend towards hierarchialism.  The essay reviews our history, theology, and the unfortunate, current tendency of our Synod to move from prizing the Priesthood of All Believers and Congregational Polity toward a foreign, non-Lutheran emphasis on maintaining and growing the structure itself and fulfilling its needs at the expense of the our “first love”:

Facebook page

You’re Invited to the New Facebook Page

At Congregations Matter, we would like to keep you up to date with our latest articles, blog posts, and events. To better serve you and the congregations of the LCMS, we launched a Facebook page: Congregations Matter. There is an ever-increasing move towards a hierarchical structure for our national church body.  It is clear that our founding fathers never envisioned this for our Synod.  Power and control should not be centered in the Synodical Office Building.  Such hierarchical control hampers the local congregation’s mission and ministry.  Synod should support the local church, not control congregations. NOW more than ever it is imperative for pastors and congregations to stay up-to-date and informed about what’s going on in the National Office — and what we can do about it.

Denninger Stands with COP Chair

SE District President Denninger Also Opposes Dangerous Bylaw Change

With a letter to the congregations and rostered members of his district,  District President (DP) John Denninger of the Southeastern District joined the growing number of LCMS leaders voicing their opposition to recent and unconstitutional bylaw changes giving final ecclesiastical supervision to President Harrison.  At President Harrison’s request and Secretary Sias’ hand, the United List majority of the Synod Board of Directors (BOD) wrested the constitutional, historic responsibility of ecclesiastical supervision from District Presidents.  Without vote or action of the Milwaukee Convention, the BOD gave this responsibility to one man. The President of Synod now is the de facto ecclesiastical supervisor of the LCMS.  Harrison has taken ecclesiastical supervisory decisions away from our 35 District Presidents.  He relocated those life-changing decisions to his own desk inside the secretive International Center in St. Louis. Wrested Power Over Congregations First, Council of Presidents Chair, Texas DP Hennings stood his ground against this dangerous

Writing A Letter

COP Chair Challenges Ecclesiastical Supervision Decision

Last Friday District President (DP) Ken Hennings sent an unprecedented, public letter to the rostered members of his district. The letter explains the drastic change that the United List majority of the Synod Board of Directors adopted in May regarding ecclesiastical supervision. But Hennings did more. The letter explains why District Presidents in Synod are no longer the final ecclesiastical supervisors of churches, pastors, teachers, DCEs and other church workers.  Our new, changed reality? Synod President Harrison has taken that job for himself. District President Hennings clearly warns of the consequence this bylaw change brings: “It is necessary that I personally make you aware of the significant changes to the process of ecclesiastical supervision in our church body. The board of directors of the Synod has adopted bylaw changes that give the ultimate responsibility for your (and your congregation’s) ecclesiastical supervision to the President of the Synod. In other words, if

Concordia Portland

LCMS Asks Concordia Portland to Leave Synod

In a surprise announcement from Concordia University Portland (CUP) Board of Regents, CUP informed LCMS congregations that Synod requested that Portland leave the Concordia University System (CUS) and become an independent Lutheran university.  You can find the full text of the announcement HERE.  This announcement sent shockwaves throughout the Concordia University system of 9 colleges and universities and congregations across the nation. The Problem Isn’t Portland — It’s Synod’s Request Announced on the CUP website on the Friday afternoon of the Memorial Day weekend, Concordia Portland leadership assured the congregations and families it serves that they will consider any action on this request with great deliberation.  Congregations Matter© couldn’t agree more.  We have full confidence in President Schlimpert’s leadership of the CUP team in response to Synod’s request.  CUP will be blessed by his delayed retirement to handle this issue.  Dr. Schlimpert isn’t the problem.  Nor is Concordia Portland. The problem is the request. Congregations in the